Medresa the door sovereign name Ali Ben Youssef (reg. 1448-1458), who served as head of Marinids while they are kept in power in Morocco during the mid-fifteenth century.

The new Medrasa was built on the same site as early mérinide probably Medrasa commanded by Ali Ben Youssef, and therefore the Medrasa Saadi takes its name of institution it was built to replace it. The "current Medrasa Ali Ben Youssef is one of the few notable Moroccan Medrasa built after the fall of the Merinids in 1465, this dynasty built almost all survivors Medrasa architectural interest in the region. The impression of "Ali ben Youssef current Medrasa is almost a perfect square, 42 meters long and wide in the plan.

History of the madrasa

Medresa the door sovereign name Ali Ben Youssef (reg. 1448-1458), who served as head of Marinids while they are kept in power in Morocco during the mid-fifteenth century. However, Medrasa that exists today was not built by Ali Ben Youssef himself, or even during his life, but the building was built by the Sharif Ghalib Saadi Abu Mohammad al (reg. 1557-1574) over a hundred years after the death of Ben Youssef.

The interior of the Madrasa

The diminutive Medrasa via its portal to the northwest corner of the building, you walk down a narrow, fenced corridor that runs parallel to the northern wall of the building, moving eastward. The corridor ends with a small vestibule covered the center of the northern facade, on axis with the center of the court. After arriving in the vestibule of the entrance corridor, the path turns right where the court and the mihrab from the prayer room on the opposite side of the courtyard are both very visible blow. The entrance in the complex processes and the articulation of the threshold between outside and inside are carefully considered to create that moment of revelation in which the splendor of the court is unexpectedly revealed and carefully framed.

The cells decoration

The decoration of the students of the cells is free, but the secondary course work have ceramic tiles and carved plaster of similar quality and complexity than that of the main courtyard. The decoration of the "Medrasa Ali Ben Youssef, while opulent and well detailed, is in many respects typical Moroccan Medrasa fifteenth century and therefore not as famous as his Orthodox plan. However, Medrasa was well maintained and remains in use to this day as one of Marrakech's most famous historic structures, it attracts thousands of architectural and religious tourists every year.

Mihrab de La madrasa

Entry to the mihrab is surrounded entirely by carved plaster, radiant plants in geometric patterns of the shoe shaped opening in the octagonal niche. The niche of the mihrab which projects beyond the qibla wall is surmounted by a muqarnas dome carved plaster.

Learn more about Medrasa Ben Youssef


Current Medrasa differs in the original structure plan in terms of the provision of student cells that surround the central courtyard